What Is A Classic Book?

By J. Peder Zane

Italo Calvino defined it is as a work that “has never finished saying what it has to say.” Ezra Pound said it possesses “a certain eternal and irrepressible freshness.” And the 19th-century French literary critic Charles Augustin Sainte-Beuve declared that “[it] has discovered some moral and not equivocal truth, or revealed some eternal passion in that heart where all seemed known and discovered.”

At first glance, these definitions of classic/great books seem on the mark. Under their umbrella of excellence, we can fit undisputed works of genius from “The Iliad” and “The Divine Comedy” to “Pride & Prejudice,” “Anna Karenina” and “Invisible Man.”

Unfortunately, they rest on a fallacy – that any and every book that exhibits these qualities will be considered a classic.  Read more …

Free and Easy Way to Support this Site

Use the Top Ten as your gateway to Amazon and we’ll receive a small commission on everything your purchase. Just click here. THANKS!

 

cTo order an inscribed copy of The Top Ten ($15, includes shipping) click here

Follow The Top Ten on: